[Loan Officers] Can I Really Accept E-Signatures?

A quick answer: Yes! You can! Yell it from the mountaintops! E-signatures are accepted! Legally, speaking e-signatures have come a long way in the past decade. There has been legislation along with standardized business practices that have aided the adoption of e-signatures. You can read the specifics (here), but to summarize, as long as all parties agree to … Continue reading [Loan Officers] Can I Really Accept E-Signatures?

What DO Millennials Want from Their Mortgage?

In a recent thought piece from Accenture, the consulting firm concludes the following: As a generation representing 86 million people in the US, millennials represent a a large and substantial opportunity that lenders cannot ignore They expect both great technology and great customer service to drive their lending experience Talk about spoiled! (Just kidding! Or am … Continue reading What DO Millennials Want from Their Mortgage?

How Technology Will Transform Every Mortgage Office in the Next Ten Years

The mortgage origination industry has had quite the decade. Huge booms turned to equally large busts as the days of NINJA loans and quick money were quickly (and wisely) regulated out of existence. Brokers took most of the heat, and the industry slowly recovered and had an impressive recovery as interest rates remained at historically low levels, prompting … Continue reading How Technology Will Transform Every Mortgage Office in the Next Ten Years

Where Does the Word “Mortgage” Come From, Anyway?

Instead of the heavy urban policy analyses this blog has been conducting lately, we have a quick, informative, and (hopefully) fun post for you. Mortgage. It’s an odd word. One that seemingly has nothing to do with any of the modern words we use for a “loan”. “Allowance”? “Credit”? “Advance” Nope, nope, and no. According to the … Continue reading Where Does the Word “Mortgage” Come From, Anyway?

Is the Urban Renaissance Leading to Income Inequality?

At Nest, we’re big fans of deep thinkers in housing and urban policy. Recently we’ve been interested in the work put out by The Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University which puts out some of the best research on Texas’ housing markets. The Kinder Institute recently highlighted the latest thinking from Richard Florida, author of … Continue reading Is the Urban Renaissance Leading to Income Inequality?

Does America Need an Urban Renaissance?

$1.6 Trillion a year. That’s the amount of lost economic output that America loses due to restrictive housing policy. A new paper, “Why Cities Matter: Local Growth and Aggregate Growth” by economists Chang-Tai Hsieh (University of Chicago) and Enrico Moretti (UC Berkeley) has, for the first time, put a dollar figure on the detrimental impacts of restrictive urban … Continue reading Does America Need an Urban Renaissance?